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See the Difference

This experimental section aims to show both subtle and extreme differences on site through seasons, works, flooding or whatever. We invite you to join in this process by with two digital, good quality photographs and a short explanation. We reserve the right to choose such photos but will publish what we can.
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This is the Winterbourne stream in 1987 and in flood in 1990. The 'riverine' woodland on the left acts as a 'storage tank' for floodwater which saves several houses further upstream from being flooded. However, is climate change or water extraction or both, having a profound effect on the Winterbourne which is not running as it used to?



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The former Uckfield viaduct, which used to run through the woodland in the grounds of Leighside House, was knocked down in 1990. The duck pond became overgown. In 2006, the Junior Management Board applied for funding to restore the pond for wildlife and were successful. The red arches show where the former viaduct used to run and the area to be restored is in the foreground. The first part of the project will be the launch of a water-saving poster by the JMB at the 30th June River Festival. This will be followed by the restoration work which will begin in the autumn of 2007.



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In 1990, the former railway sidings were taken away as the part of the sale of the land to Lewes District Council. The 'devastation' at the time was complete! But the wonder of such sites is their robustness and within a year, many of the plants were back. This now acts as a huge storage area for floodwater which has happened several times since 1990.



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This is Chilly Brook in October 2007 before and after some important dredging work to the ditches. This has to be done on a regular 8 year cycle in order to retain the diversity of species that are to be found here. If we did not undertake this work, the ditches would eventually fill up with river silt at times of flood and we would lose the water and all the wildlife that it sustains.



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The Junior Management Board won an award to restore Leighside Pond with a Young Roots Heritage Lottery grant and took a photo of the old pond in February 2006. The work was completed in 2007with a JCB digger and the participants of the Nature Corridors for All project took the second photograph on behalf of the JMB on 16th October 2007. They will take monthly photographs from the same point for a year.



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We seeded parts of Chilly Brook with a mix of wildflower seeds and grass on 30th September 2008 and this is how it looked on14th October, 2008. These are the seeds:

Yarrow, Common Knapweed, Meadowsweet, Lady’s Bedstraw, Oxeye Daisy, Greater Birdsfoot Trefoil, Ragged Robin, Ribwort Plantain, Cowslip, Selfheal, Meadow Buttercup, Yellow Rattle, Common Sorrel, Great Burnet, Pepper-saxifrage, Betony and Tufted Vetch.

Photos by Kathy and Miles.