Railway Land Live

Sea Level Rise



Nature Corridors for All on Facebook

Get the latest from Nature Corridors 4 All

Lewes Railway Land Wildlife Trust logo designed by 11-year-old Alex Mobbs

  Visit the datastore
Nature icon
Where am I? HomeNature › [!Page title]

Nature Photo Gallery

So many visitors to the Railway Land say that they can't see anything when they visit the site that, in 2000, the Trust commissioned local photographer David Bradford to take photos of some of the creatures that live in our Reserve. The result took people's breath away in a highly successful exhibition held at Thebes Gallery, Lewes, from 4 - 12th November, 2000. David owns the copyright of these superb photos but kindly permitted the Trust to use them for educational purposes and so we proudly display them here and hope they will inspire visitors to look more closely, to find out more and to support our efforts to build a permanent centre at the entrance to the Reserve.

Comma butterfly

Comma butterfly
See the distinctive white C or comma shape under the wing? We think its ragged edged wing is to help with camouflage but the books will tell you that nobody knows where it sleeps in winter. Isn't that amazing!

Top of page

Cardinal Beetle

Cardinal Beetle
It's not difficult to see where this beetle gets its common name from but its latin name is pyrochroa serraticornis because of its serrated antennae, like a saw. David photographed this near the Winterbourne stream while it was resting on a stinging nettle.

Top of page

Great silver water beetle

Great silver water beetle
In terms of bulk and weight, this is our largest beetle, and it's quite rare. It traps air on its underside by its hairs which is why it gets a silvery look. With its dramatic jet black top, this wonderful creature can grow up to 5 cms long.

Top of page

Humming-bird Hawk-moth

Humming-bird Hawk-moth
Did you know we had such creatures in this country, let alone on our doorstep? David took this in the early evening and was pleased to capture the beating wings which are normally so fast that all you can see is the body. It makes a faint humming sound which apparently women can hear better than men.

Top of page

Viper's Bugloss and Wild Mignonette

Viper's Bugloss and Wild Mignonette
David didn't only take photos of creatures but turned his incredible eye onto flowers when the light and time of day was right.

Top of page